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Professor, Renal Medicine
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Dr. Janice P. Lea, MD is  Professor of medicine at Emory University and is board-certified in nephrology and hypertension.  Dr. Lea graduated from the University of Texas at Austin with a degree in biology.  She earned her medical degree at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston and completed her residency in internal medicine and a nephrology fellowship at Emory University affiliated hospitals.  Dr. Lea has also received a Masters of Science in Clinical Research from Emory’s School of Public Health.  Dr. Lea’s research interests are in hypertension and kidney disease and she is the Emory Principal Investigator for the National Institutes of Health study, African-American Study of Kidney Disease and Hypertension (AASK). Dr. Lea has been recently named Chief Medical Director of Emory Dialysis.   She also is the co-director of the Emory Hypertension Research Center and serves as co-Investigator for other clinical trials related to hypertension and CKD.  Dr. Lea is one of three National Medical Spokesperson’s for the National Kidney Disease Education Program (NKDEP) sponsored by the National Institutes of Health.

Dr. Lea is a nationally-renowned expert in hypertension and is designated a “Clinical Specialist in Hypertension” by the American Society of Hypertension.  She has been an invited guest speaker to numerous national conferences including the American Heart Association, National Medical Association, Congressional Black Caucus, and numerous other legislative and medical meetings.  Dr. Lea is a member of the American Society of Nephrology, National Kidney Foundation, and the International Society of Hypertension in Blacks.  She also is very active in the community setting volunteering her time to educate susceptible populations about their risks of kidney disease due to hypertension and diabetes.

Dr. Lea’s clinical practice is primarily that of managing difficult cases of hypertension, treating patients with chronic kidney disease due to diabetes and hypertension, and End-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients receiving home or in-center dialysis therapy.  She manages patients at Emory, Midtown,  Grady, and Wesley Woods hospitals.  Her primary office for outpatient clinic is at Emory Midtown Medical Office Tower.  She is medical director of the Emory Greenbriar Dialysis Clinic and of the Home Dialysis Program at Emory Northside.  Dr. Lea has been named by Atlanta magazine as one of Atlanta's Top Nephrologists for 2009 and 2010.

Her research interests are in hypertension and kidney disease and she has published many papers in this field.  She is the Emory Principal Investigator for the National Institutes of Health study, African-American Study of Kidney Disease and Hypertension (AASK). Dr. Lea is a member of the Emory Institutional Review Board for human subject research and a committee member of the Emory General Clinical Research Center.

Dr. Lea’s clinical practice is primarily that of managing difficult cases of hypertension, treating patients with chronic kidney disease due to diabetes and hypertension, and End-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients receiving home or in-center dialysis therapy.  She manages patients at Emory, Crawford Long, VA, Grady, and Wesley Woods hospitals.  Her primary office for outpatient clinic is at Crawford Long Medical Office Tower.  She is medical director of the Davita Dialysis clinic in East Point, GA.  In addition, she is medical director of the Evercare demonstration project for dialysis patients. 

Dr. Lea supervises housestaff at Emory and Crawford Long Hospitals, as well as at the VA and Grady hospitals.  Dr. Lea lectures to Emory medical students and housestaff on complications of chronic kidney disease, hypertension, diabetes, and renal physiology.  She is a nationally recognized expert in the field of hypertension and is a Clinical Specialist in Hypertension through the American Society of Hypertension.  Dr. Lea was a plenary speaker on the topic of “High Risk Hypertension” at the annual American Heart Association meeting in 2005; and has been a guest speaker at many national medical and legislative conferences including the American Heart Association, National Medical Association, and Congressional Black Caucus.  

She also is very active in the community setting volunteering her time to educate susceptible populations about their risks of kidney disease due to hypertension and diabetes by participating in numerous community and church healthfairs. She received the volunteer of the year award in 2004 from the American Kidney Fund.  Dr. Lea is one of three National Medical Spokesperson’s for the National Kidney Disease Education Program(NKDEP) sponsored by the National Institutes of Health.  Dr. Lea is a member of the American Society of Nephrology, and is a medical advisory board member for the National Kidney Foundation (NKF) and the International Society of Hypertension in Blacks (ISHIB).  Dr. Lea has chaired the scientific planning committees for both the Georgia National Kidney Foundation and the ISHIB annual meetings.

Publications & Presentations

Lea Janice P., Brown Denyse T., Lipkowitz Michael, Middleton John, Norris Keith (for the AASK Study Group).   Preventing Renal Dysfunction in Patients with Hypertension: Clinical Implications from the Early AASK Trial Results.  <i>Am. J Cardiovasc. Drugs</i> 3 (3):  193-200, 2003.

Lea JP,and Nicholas, S.  Diabetes mellitus and Hypertension: Key Kidney Disease Risk Factors in the  Journal of the National Medical Assoc. Suppl.- Racial Disparities in Kidney Disease. Journal of the NMA 94, suppl. 8, 7S-15S, 2002.

Adegobuku, C., Lea JP Jamerson, K. Update on Disparities in the Pathophysiology and Management of Hypertension:  Focus on African-Americans:  Medical Clinics of North America  89 (2005) pp. 921-933.

Lea J, Greene T, Hebert  L, Lipkowitz M, Massry S, Middleton J, Rostand S, Miller EP, Smith W, and Bakris GL for the AASK Study Investigators. The Relationship between Magnitude of Proteinuria Reduction and  Risk of End-Stage Renal Disease:  Results of the AASK Trial.   <i>Archives Int. Med</i> 165:947-953, 2005.