FAME Grant

The FAME (Fostering the Academic Mission in the Emory Department of Medicine) grant program is designed to provide support for faculty to dedicate up to 20% of their professional time to scholarly activity including research, education, quality improvement projects and mentoring.

Requests for Letters of Intent are sent annually in late winter/early spring to the Emory Department of Medicine all-faculty listserv depending on availability of funds. Funding runs for one academic year.

The FAME taskforce was formed in March 2007 by the department's Executive Committee to identify specific strategies to better support the engagement of clinical faculty in the academic missions of scholarship and teaching. 

FAQs and Guidelines

What are FAME Grants? 
FAME Grants are an internal funding mechanism offered by the Department of Medicine (DOM) designed to provide support for clinical faculty to dedicate up to 20% of their professional time to scholarly activity, including research, education, quality improvement (QI) projects and mentoring. 

Who is eligible to apply?
Applications are restricted to DOM faculty whose salary is 100% funded by clinical sources (Emory Clinic professional billings, Emory Medical Care Foundation professional billings, Grady expense or VA Medical Center clinical funding). Applicants must have an active faculty appointment at the time of submission of the grant.

How much funding does the grant offer?
The grant offers salary support up to 20% of the applicant’s base salary, not to exceed 20% of the 50th percentile of Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) compensation for the faculty member’s rank and specialty. Up to two grants will be offered in FY18 and each grant runs for one fiscal year (September 2017 - August 2018).

What is the deadline?
The FY18 letters of intent are due Monday, 3/13 and the full application is due on Monday, 5/1. There is an optional, but strongly encouraged, grant writing class offered on Tuesday, 3/28. 

What are the guidelines for submission?
Download full application guidelines (PDF) 

Additional help
If you have any questions, please email us.

Past FAME Grant Recipients

2016

Kari Esbensen (Hospital Medicine)
"Deepening the Interview with Seriously Ill Patients: Implementing and Evaluating a Structured Bedside Curriculum to Enhance Communication Skills, Empathetic Listening and Reflective Practice among Third-year Students on the Medicine Clerkship"

Christopher O'Donnell (Hospital Medicine)
“Quantitative and Qualitative Analysis of Hospitalists’, Primary Care Providers’, and Subacute Nursing Facilities’ Attitudes Regarding Barriers to Effective Discharge Summaries & Impact of Structured Discharge Summary on Improving Handoffs at Hospital Discharge”

2015

John Paul Norvell (Digestive Diseases)
"Multi-Parametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A New Non-Invasive Test to Predict Liver Outcomes"

Gina Lundberg (Cardiology)
"Release Time Grant for 10,000 Women Hypertension Screening Project"

2012

Melissa Stevens (Hospital Medicine) Watch video
"Use of High Risk Medications in the Elderly in the Emergency Department Setting: A Quality Improvement Initiative"

2011

Joanna Bonsall (Hospital Medicine)
"Reducing Medical Errors among Hospitalized Patients through Improved Provider Communication"

Carmen Mohan (General Medicine)
"Beyond the Office Visit: Pilot, Initial Evaluation, and Capacity Enhancement of a Social Medicine Elective"

Stacie Schmidt (General Medicine)
"Implementation of a Multidisciplinary Program Teaching Patient Self-Management Skills to Underserved Persons with Multiple Chronic Diseases" 

2010

Vandana Niyyar (Renal Division)
"Does early intervention by a multi-disciplinary vascular access team improve arteriovenous fistula prevalence rate in a dialysis population?"

Kristina Lundberg (General Medicine)
"Building Communication Skills - a needs assessment and curriculum development program for internal medicine residents."

2009

Lesley Miller (General Medicine)
“Cutting losses: Investigating reasons for sub-optimal Liver Clinic follow-up and testing strategies to improve continuity of care"

Robin Klein (General Medicine)
"Scholarship in Primary Care - new curriculum that focuses on promoting scholastic endeavors by the primary care residents"

2008

David Kuhar (Infectious Diseases)
"Decreasing complications and improving satisfaction in patients receiving outpatient parenteral anitmicrobial therapy."

FAME Grant Success Stories

Melissa Stevens, MD (Hospital Medicine) - watch video

Topic: "Use of High Risk Medications in the Elderly in the Emergency Department Setting: A Quality Improvement Initiative"
With support from a Department of Medicine FAME (Fostering the Academic Mission at Emory) grant in 2012, Dr. Stevens implemented a multicomponent quality improvement program to facilitate safer prescribing at ED discharge through education, ‘geriatricized’ medication order sets (inspired by the Beers criteria – named for geriatrician Mark Beers), and provider audit and feedback with peer benchmarking. When funding became available through the VA’s Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Centers (GRECCs) to promote clinical demonstration projects aimed at optimizing care for older Veterans, Dr. Stevens teamed up with Emory geriatrician and GRECC investigator, Camille Vaughan (another 2006 alumna), to expand the program, now called EQUIPPED (Enhancing Quality of Prescribing Practices for Older Adults Discharged from the Emergency Department).

EQUIPPED has been continuously funded by VA since 2012 and is now being implemented in 8 VA EDs (including VA GRECCs affiliated with UAB, Vanderbilt, Duke, and Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai). Results from Atlanta were published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society in May 2015 demonstrating a 50% relative reduction in inappropriate prescriptions for older adults discharged from the ED. EQUIPPED was awarded a 2014 John A. Hartford Foundation pilot grant to expand outside the VA and the team, led by Drs. Vaughan and Stevens, has a proposal currently under review with AHRQ.

Read preliminary results from the first VA sites in this 2015 Journal of the American Geriatrics Society article. See also: U.S. Medicine article.

Robin Klein, MD (General Medicine)

Topic: Scholarship in Primary Care - new curriculum that focuses on promoting scholastic endeavors by the primary care residents
"The curriculum has been very successful. Residents have given dozens of presentations at meetings, earned awards and been part of many publications. What I take away from this experience is that scholarship and research can be interesting and useful to a variety of residents with different career goals. To achieve this it is vital to think broadly about scholarship to include clinical research, quality work, practice application, outcomes research, and medical education scholarship. Our curriculum is now funded by a federal training grant. New layers are added to the curriculum with each class of residents. Currently, I am looking at the impact of the curriculum on trainees and graduates."

Lesley Miller, MD (General Medicine)

Topic: Cutting losses: Investigating reasons for sub-optimal Liver Clinic follow-up and testing strategies to improve continuity of care
"We learned that appointment keeping was not related to their concerns about their disease, or logistical factors, but was related to clinic factors such as interval between appointments and lack of reminder phone calls. We implemented changes in the Liver Clinic based on these results, i.e., reminder phone calls and efforts to minimize intervals between appointments. The FAME project has also laid the groundwork for additional extramural grant applications/funding for other Grady Liver Clinic projects."

Vandana Niyyar, MD (Nephrology)

Topic: Does early intervention by a multi-disciplinary vascular access team improve arteriovenous fistula prevalence rate in a dialysis population?
"With the encouraging results from the FAME grant, we improved the quality of care for our hemodialysis patients. Not only do the patients in our protocol have a better access for chronic hemodialysis, but this has encouraged us to consider the expansion of this project to other hemodialysis units at Emory. A subsequent project in collaboration with the CDC focuses on decreasing the incidence of bloodstream infections in chronic hemodialysis patients by instituting preventive measures and participation in a national BSI prevention program, augmented by a social and  behavioral change process to enlist staff members in infection prevention."

Contact Us

For more information on FAME Grants please email us at domresearch@emory.edu or call 404-727-3364.