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Janet Klein, PhD

Associate Professor of Medicine

        (404) 727-9933

                                                

 

    

     

 





     The polyuria that occurs in diabetic patients is generally ascribed to an osmotic diuresis. We believe that the mechanisms are more complex. The production of concentrated urine requires complex interactions among the medullary nephron segments and vasculature. A major goal of my research is to identify the cellular and molecular mechanisms that contribute to changes in water and solute homeostasis that occur in uncontrolled diabetes. Recent reports from the CDC indicate that diabetes mellitus has reached epidemic proportions in the U.S. The polyuria that occurs in diabetic patients is generally ascribed to an osmotic diuresis. We believe that the mechanisms are more complex. Several metabolic and hormonal abnormalities present in diabetes mellitus and could contribute to abnormalities in solute and water handling. A major emphasis of my research is to identify the cellular and molecular mechanisms that contribute to changes in water and solute homeostasis that occur in uncontrolled diabetes. Our recent findings were the first to propose that compensatory changes in renal medullary transport proteins occurred during uncontrolled diabetes. We believe that our research will provide novel insights into the pathophysiology of uncontrolled diabetes. This understanding will be important for designing better therapeutic strategies as new agents, such as selective vasopressin agonists and antagonists, become available for clinical use. Identifying these mechanisms could provide novel insights into the compensatory mechanisms that must occur in the kidney so that patients with uncontrolled type I diabetes rarely present in hypovolemic shock during conditions associated with volume depletion, such as diabetic ketoacidosis.

Publications (PubMed)