Janet D Klein, PhD, MS

Associate Professor of Medicine

Department of Medicine

Office: WMRB 338

Phone: 404-727-9933

Fax: 404-727-3425

Email: janet.klein@emory.edu

Biography

Dr. Klein received her B.S. in Biochemistry from the University of Scranton and M.S. and Ph.D. in Chemistry from New Mexico State University with a major in Biochemistry and a minor in Analytical Chemistry. Her dissertation described a novel transglutaminase in Physarum polycephalum. Her first postdoctoral position was at the Terre Haute Center for Medical Education and her second postdoctoral position was with the American Red Cross in Farmington Connecticut. During these postdoctoral fellowships she studied the protein biochemistry of the coagulation cascade enzymes concentrating on Protein C and Protein S. Her third postdoctoral position brought her to Emory University working with Dr. Lawrence Philips in the Department of Medicine, Endocrinology. Following this she moved to the Renal Division and was made an Instructor in 1993, an Assistant Professor in 1997 and an Associate Professor in 2003. Her research interest has always been in protein biochemistry. For the past 6 years she has been investigating various transport mechanisms in the kidney with an emphasis on the urea transporters.
  • 1982 – present Member Sigma Xi
  • 2000 – 2004 Member International Society of Nephrology
  • 2003 – present Member American Society of Nephrology
  • 1993 – 2003 Member American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
  • 2003 - present Member American Physiological Society
  • 2004 – present Member Editorial Board, American Journal of Physiology, Renal
  • 2004 – 2005 Grant Review American Heart Association Peer Review: Molecular Signaling I
  • 2002 – present Ext.l Reviewer VA merit award grant applications
  • 2002 – present Ext.l Reviewer National Kidney Research Fund Grant Applications UK
  • 2003 – present Peer Review AJP, JASN, JBC, KI

The polyuria that occurs in diabetic patients is generally ascribed to an osmotic diuresis. We believe that the mechanisms are more complex. The production of concentrated urine requires complex interactions among the medullary nephron segments and vasculature. A major goal of my research is to identify the cellular and molecular mechanisms that contribute to changes in water and solute homeostasis that occur in uncontrolled diabetes.

Recent reports from the CDC indicate that diabetes mellitus has reached epidemic proportions in the U.S. The polyuria that occurs in diabetic patients is generally ascribed to an osmotic diuresis. We believe that the mechanisms are more complex. Several metabolic and hormonal abnormalities present in diabetes mellitus and could contribute to abnormalities in solute and water handling. A major emphasis of my research is to identify the cellular and molecular mechanisms that contribute to changes in water and solute homeostasis that occur in uncontrolled diabetes. Our recent findings were the first to propose that compensatory changes in renal medullary transport proteins occurred during uncontrolled diabetes. We believe that our research will provide novel insights into the pathophysiology of uncontrolled diabetes. This understanding will be important for designing better therapeutic strategies as new agents, such as selective vasopressin agonists and antagonists, become available for clinical use.

Identifying these mechanisms could provide novel insights into the compensatory mechanisms that must occur in the kidney so that patients with uncontrolled type I diabetes rarely present in hypovolemic shock during conditions associated with volume depletion, such as diabetic ketoacidosis.

Research

Dr. Klein’s works closely with Dr. Sands and is the protein chemist for the Urea Group. Her area of interest is particularly the response of the urea transporters to diabetes. As well as investigating this relationship, she oversees the day-to-day research of Dr. Sands group.

Publications

  • View publications on NCBI